In the Country of Men



In the Country of MenLibya, 1979 Nine Year Old Suleiman S Days Are Circumscribed By The Narrow Rituals Of Childhood Outings To The Ruins Surrounding Tripoli, Games With Friends Played Under The Burning Sun, Exotic Gifts From His Father S Constant Business Trips Abroad But His Nights Have Come To Revolve Around His Mother S Increasingly Disturbing Bedside Stories Full Of Old Family Bitterness And Then One Day Suleiman Sees His Father Across The Square Of A Busy Marketplace, His Face Wrapped In A Pair Of Dark Sunglasses Wasn T He Supposed To Be Away On Business Yet Again Why Is He Going Into That Strange Building With The Green Shutters Why Did He Lie Suleiman Is Soon Caught Up In A World He Cannot Hope To Understand Where The Sound Of The Telephone Ringing Becomes A Portent Of Grave Danger Where His Mother Frantically Burns His Father S Cherished Books Where A Stranger Full Of Sinister Questions Sits Outside In A Parked Car All Day Where His Best Friend S Father Can Disappear Overnight, Next To Be Seen Publicly Interrogated On State Television.In The Country Of Men Is A Stunning Depiction Of A Child Confronted With The Private Fallout Of A Public Nightmare But Above All, It Is A Debut Of Rare Insight And Literary Grace.

Hisham Matar was born in New York City, where his father was working for the Libyan delegation to the United Nations When he was three years old, his family went back to Tripoli, Libya, where he spent his early childhood Due to political persecutions by the Ghaddafi regime, in 1979 his father was accused of being a reactionary to the Libyan revolutionary regime and was forced to flee the country

[Ebook] ↠ In the Country of Men Author Hisham Matar – Oldtimertips.us
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 256 pages
  • In the Country of Men
  • Hisham Matar
  • English
  • 27 February 2017
  • 9780241973622

10 thoughts on “In the Country of Men

  1. Tea Jovanović says:

    Kod nas je objavio Marso Proverite za to je ova knjiga podobijala tolike nagrade ili bila u u em irem izboru za nagrade Libija Za ljubitelje Lovca na zmajeve ili Jutra u D eninu ili Pitanja i odgovora i Belog tigra

  2. okyrhoe says:

    The child narrator s point of view is only the tip of the iceberg It s as if the boy s view of the world is warped by the surface of the water Actually, Suleiman isn t a particularly likeable character On the contrary, the reader is discouraged from identifying with the first person narrator, for he recounts episodes of his boyhood in which he indulges in inexplicable cruel behavior which contrasts sharply with the boy s childish innocence in the face of evil and deceit While the book s language is pretty much straightforward and uncomplicated, to the point that at first I thought this wasn t going to be worth my while, as I read on, became engrossed by the subversive elements of the plot, and the constant interplay of the two temporal pasts of the narrative Najwa the mother s past vs Suleiman the boy s past In the Country of Men has been criticized by Arab commentators for being politically vague, for depicting the opposition to the Libyan regime as a slipshod endeavor, in effect caricaturing the resistance movement IMO this is what gives the book its humanity and poignancy The novel s primary critique of contemporary Arab society is that this country of men no longer operates according to manly codes of conduct All sense of justice, faith, honor, respect seems to have decayed This can be seen in the juxtaposition between the strict m...

  3. Sue says:

    From my blog written by Hisham Matar and published in February 2007 by The Dial Press This is Matar s bio as written on the end flap Hisham Matar was born in 1970 in New York city to Libyan parents and spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo He lives in London and is currently at work on his second novel In the Country of Men will be published in twenty two languages.This was a difficult book to read, not because of the density of the writing dense it was not but because the characters drew you into their lives in such a way that you wanted to, but couldn t, dialog with them The story is told through the eyes and voice of a 9 year old boy, Suleiman, as he describes how he sees what s happening to his family his mother, his father, and his uncle and their immediate friends and relatives in Libya in 1979.The story is tragic in many ways, but life is life and tragedy is part of it You have to take it as it is because it s the only way to get to know, appreciate, and respect those whose lives are different from our own.Just the other evening, a group of us were talking about what we perceived as the tragic lives of an elderly couple we all know, a couple who never has enough money to buy healthy food or clothing and who lives in substandard housing Yet, you can t go in and fix the situation, or even try, unless you re asked, because the damage to human dignity, when you try to make a happily ever after, according to our own individual standards, is often damag...

  4. Chrissie says:

    I began by reading The Return Fathers, Sons, and the Land in Between and I wanted In the Country of Men, by the same author, is fiction with a strong autobiographical basis Having read the two books in this order one can easily differentiate between fictional and non fictional elements The two books are not the same reading them both is not repetitive In this book, we look at a young Libyan boy growing up under Qaddafi s military dictatorship The year is 1979, and the boy s father is a dissident fighting for change We see through the eyes of a nine year old The boy is trying to understand his parents troubled relationship He is trying to understand the world around him It is a coming of age story about a young boy who wants to be a man, still loves his mother deeply with the immature love of a child and yet also loves, admires and respects his father Growing up is about growing independent, and the book shows this with a deft eye We observe the boy s relationships with classmates, neighbors, and family The ride is emotional, so observe is in fact the wrong word The book shines in how it so accurately and so heartrendingly shows his innocence and his growing awareness of an adult world where opposition has dire consequences What do you choose Are you quiet, do you say nothing, do you stay...

  5. Margitte says:

    The book is, once again, a narrative told by the people of a country, about their country for their country and the world.As communism is dying around the world, and the effects it had on people s lives are appearing and all over the planet, the reader is drawn into this story by the nine year old Suleima writing about his life in Libya and what happened to his nuclear family, the extended family, the neighbor and friends in 1979 during the regime of Mohammar Khadafi His dad, Faraj, is a successful businessman who did nothing unacceptable when he raped his unconscious fifteen year old virgin bride, Najwa, on their wedding night, since it was totally fine in their male dominated culture But for the unhappy, unwilling bride, it created years of bitterness which she had to address on her own through her secret ma...

  6. ala& says:

    . ..

  7. Nada Elfeituri says:

    I m a Libyan, so as soon as I heard of the existence of this book I ran to get it There aren t many Libyan authors because, as usual, of Gadhafi , so I have respect for the ones out there My expectations for this book were really high After the revolution any bit of culture that was Libya related was treated like gold I knew a lot of people who loved this book, so I guess I built it up in my head to be a masterpiece or something.Unfortunately it didn t meet up to my ridiculous fantasies The story is told from the point of the view of the main protagonist, a nine year boy named Suleiman While the portrayal of life under Gadhafi was accurate, it was told through the impatient and shallow perspective of a child The story didn t really have a plot, it was a short memoir More than once I was reminded of The Kite Runner, albeit ...

  8. Sve says:

    9 , , , , , , .

  9. Nesrin Saad says:

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